The Honda CB125e is about as simple a new motorcycle as you can buy, and yet, its accessibility and efficiency make it one of Australia’s most important road-going models.

Many riders remember the Honda CB125e from their earliest riding experiences, as the model is often used by rider training facilities like Stay Upright and HART, among others.

Honda CB125e 2020
The Honda CB125e is priced from just $2699.

Its lightweight and approachable ergonomics make it perfect for a new rider’s first foray onto the road, and its basic and dependable design means it can take a beating.

It may not be so attractive to the ‘serious’ rider, but from just $2699 plus on-road costs, you’d be hard pressed to find a comparable commuter for city runs, or a more efficient tool for delivery people.

Powering the bike is a 124cc air-cooled single, while notable specs extend to little more than a single disc brake, a rear luggage rack and an analogue dash with a speedometer, trip and fuel gauge.

Honda CB125e dash
No sat-nav or adaptive suspension settings to be found here.

Earlier this year Honda Motorcycles Australia stole headlines with the arrival of its all-new CT125, revamping the iconic Australian postie bike, although its high price of $6999 makes it more an object of nostalgia than value.

This week, Honda UK released an updated version of its CB125F, a higher spec model sold in Europe, positioned similiarly to the CB125e as an inexpensive urban commuter.

While Honda’s local arm told INFO MOTO that it has no plans to import the CB125F at this stage, it’s possible that some of its features will makes its way to the CB125e if it is to ever receive a facelift.

Honda CB125F
The Honda CB125F is for overseas markets only.

Differences between the Honda CB125F and CB125e

  • Australian CB125e has the classic retro CB look, while the European bike has a more modern style.
  • The engine is different. The Aussie bike uses a carburettor, while the new CB125F is fuel injected.
  • CB125e has halogen headlights, the Euro has LED.
  • The CB125e has analogue instruments, the CB125F has a digital display.
  • European model has a centre stand, we don’t.
  • They have CBS (combined brake system), we don’t.
  • CB125e’s fuel tank is bigger (14L v 13L).

Honda CB125F

Is the Honda CB125e Australia’s most important road bike? If not, what do you think is? Tell us your thoughts in the comment section below.

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Simon Stephens
Simon Stephens
3 years ago

The $64 question is of course, will the CB125E continue to be available in Australia, given it lacks and “advanced braking system”, and as such will not be able to be sold from 1/1/2021 onwards. Honda hasnt indicated whether the Euro version (which does meet the new ADRs) will be a replacement, or if the model will be dropped. As an aside, the current Australian model doesnt have halogen lights (its old school krypton globes), but DOES have a centre stand.

Gav
Gav
Reply to  Simon Stephens
3 years ago

I thought it came with a candle! However a halogen bulb is a simple swapover

It certainly does have a centre stand.

Simon Stephens
Simon Stephens
Reply to  Gav
3 years ago

You can change the globe to halogen BA20 and it makes a big difference. With stock headlight its a bit like riding via brail.

Mick
Mick
Reply to  Simon Stephens
3 years ago

hi Simon
I’m thinking of buying one as my first bike-just got my learners-What are your thoughts as a First bike – keep in mind I’m New to riding therefore my skill levels don’t exist the reason why I have chosen this bike to buy- I’m not looking for speed ATM but concerns for No ABS

grant roff
grant roff
3 years ago

Heavier and slower than the 1972 Honda 125 single. Such is progress…

Alan
Alan
3 years ago

It’s a dinosaur, and the only reason we’re still buying them is because of a lack of any real alternative.