Honda Australia stole headlines last week when it announced the arrival of its all-new CT125, revamping the iconic Australian postie bike.

The CT125 is available in two colours, Glowing Red and Matte Fresco Brown, but comes at a surprisingly high price of $6,999 plus on-road costs.

A number of readers pointed out just how many small-capacity learner-approved motorcycles can be had for that kind of money, or less, which offer comparable, or better, performance and equipment.

For instance, Honda’s basic-but-functional CB125e is priced from just $2699 plus on-road costs, less than half the price of the CT125.

You could argue that the CB125e misses out on things like a digital dash, and LED lighting, but the same can not be said for models like the Honda CB300R.

Honda CB300R
The Honda CB300R is around $300 cheaper than the CT125.

The CB300R naked sportsbike can be had from $6649 plus on-road costs, just over $300 less than the CT125, and features a significantly more powerful 287cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder engine, modern looks, disc brakes, LED lighting, an LCD instrument cluster and much more.

In short, one does not have to look far to find a much more advanced, and more capable, LAMS motorcycle for less than $7000.

Despite this, the Honda CT125 will likely sell thanks to its particular nostalgic charm, but those looking for function-over-form will surely look elsewhere.

Honda has done well to retain the original bike’s distinctive looks.

“While simplifying the surface of each part on the frame, we carefully took the symbolic features of the CT series, including the upswept muffler, air cleaner cover, fuel tank, large carrier and steel front fender and created a balanced new image of the tough old CT,” said Honda Australia in a press release.

To meet modern standards, the CT125 is ABS equipped.

The new bike is based on the brand’s Super Cub chassis, and features a 125cc single-cylinder engine matched with a four-speed semi-automatic transmission.

The new model benefits from an electric start, ABS, LED lighting and a digital display, and features an increased wheel base, seat height and upswept handlebars compared to the Super Cub upon which it’s based.

Speaking of, the new Honda C125 Super Cub launched earlier this year from $6199 plus on-road costs, and is available in two colours: Pearl and Nebula Red.

Honda Super Cub
The 2020 Honda Super Cub is priced from $6199 plus on-road costs.

The Super Cub is powered by a 125cc air-cooled fuel-injected single-cylinder engine, matched with a three-speed automatic gearbox.

Compared to the original design, the new C125 features longer travel front and rear suspension, 17-inch cast aluminium wheels and a disc brake at the front.

The bike also gains LED lighting, while the instrument cluster combines an analogue speedo with a modern, yet “understated”, digital display.

Does the Honda CT125’s heritage justify its pricetag? Tell us your thoughts in the comment section below.

Honda CT125

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Terry Prendergast
Terry Prendergast
9 months ago

Well you’ll have to excuse my cynicism, but considering that these bikes are purpose designed for Australia Post, Honda has done what every contractor does when they latch on to a fat government contract, they double, or triple the price. Not particularly ethical, but not unusual, either…………

SteveR
SteveR
Reply to  Terry Prendergast
2 months ago

Not purpose designed for Australia Post, their origins are in the USA. Still very expensive given the alternatives out there. Sold worldwide including quite big followings in Thailand (they even have stores dedicated solely to the Super Cub and Cub Trail – CT125), the USA and Europe.

James
James
Reply to  Terry Prendergast
2 months ago

It’s not your cynicism on display just your ignorance. That, across the world, is the biggest seller in its space. Nothing to do with aust government contracts. Get the facts.

Grant Roff
Grant Roff
9 months ago

Australia Post has stopped buying them, Terry. These bikes are out on their own now. Hope Honda Australia didn’t buy too many. The dealer in Bendigo (Vic) already has them at $6500 ride away. Honda should get back to me when they’re the same price as the CB125E.

Shaun
Shaun
8 months ago

Yep a couple of grand for the nostalgia by the looks of it…..

Bikerinpursuit
Bikerinpursuit
6 months ago

Just seems like HONDA being GREEDY . They knew the CT110 was popular to the public , but couldn’t be purchased by the public , only at an auction after AUSTRALIA POST had decommissioned them . There was a small window where the public could buy the CT110 in a dual range model , i think for about a 12 month period , which sold well . $8000.00 for a POSTIE BIKE is a lot of money , which can buy a lot more bike than a POSTIE BIKE , They should be priced around the $3500 – $4000 mark , compatible price with the HONDA CB125E , which would sell like hot cakes .

Dave Ashworth
Dave Ashworth
6 months ago

I have a weather beaten 2000-build CT110. Like everyone else in Australia. I paid $1100 for it about 8 years ago. It’s loads of fun and very very reliable. As soon as I come across an 80 speed limit sign I know we’re out of our depth and need to turn around. What I paid for mine is about what anything this slow and limited is worth. Honda should be selling the newbie for $1800 ride away.

john mann
john mann
6 months ago

I brought a Honda C200 (90cc),
in 1964 124 English pound. 
You have to ask how many weeks work 
to buy in 1964 and 2020.

Greg Leech
Admin
Reply to  john mann
5 months ago

A wise choice then though John!

john mann
john mann
Reply to  john mann
14 days ago

If only I had kept it.
Am going to order CT125 on Tuesday, recapture my youth.

Jezza
Jezza
5 months ago

You would have to be quite mad to pay that much, its a postie bike or a put put scooter….very low power, small wheels, stiff low travel suspension.I can clearly remember going from my 98 ct110 to a basic low end 250 four stroke dual sport and laughing how much safer, and faster it was. These things are are too slow on the open road and too dangerous on rough tracks.

From what I was told Aus post gets rid of them at around 30,000km because they become unreliable with things like the gearbox. Mine 2nd hand at only 26000km had a terrible gearbox that would slip into false neatrals about 25% of the time when going up or down any hill/climb. Getting rid of that postie was a huge weight lifted off me…

Mark
Mark
Reply to  Jezza
5 months ago

Aus post kept their ct110’s for 2 years with equated to between 20k to 30k, the reason for swapping them out had more to do with resale value than reliability. As with any vehicle the longer you keep it the more the maintenance is.Honda stopped making the ct110 back in 2012 so they could streamline their product line. There was two versions of the ct110, the psotie version and the ag bike version. The postie version had about a dozen differences from the ag bike version such as strengthened frame, no enclosed chain. I wonder if the new ct125 is built as a product to carry a load as the original was. Original brand new ct110 used to sell at $4666, from memory.

Mark
Mark
4 months ago

Way overpriced

Jeff
Jeff
1 month ago

I bought one. Yeah rudely expensive but i want it bad. My sentiment will be shared by many and theres already a backlog at the dealers. Guess honda wins. Take my money.

David
David
Reply to  Jeff
1 month ago

I bought my first Honda 90 in Warren NSW in 1964 for 156 pounds. It was yellow. I rode it all over NSW on relief staff for the Bank of NSW. Many great memories until I warped the head from excessive “high speed!” Riding.